Category: Workforce Development

Livingston Workforce Services

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2016 Heartland Annual Update: Employers see success with Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program

Pontiac employers see success with HCC’s Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program.

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2014 Heartland Annual Update: GLCEDC partners with Heartland Community College to create Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program

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Livingston County’s Global Influence

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GLCEDC World Map

2016 Heartland Annual Update: Employers see success with Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program (Chinese Edition)

The GLCEDC Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing Program flyer is now available in Chinese.

To download the Chinese Edition, CLICK HERE.    要下载中国版,请点击此处

Unemployment & Labor Force Statistics

Illinois Unemployment Rate by County (PDF)

Monthly Labor Force Statistics for Economic Development Regions (PDF)

Travis Williams exhibits what Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program intends

Williams exhibits what GLCEDC class intends
Pontiac Daily Leader
January 31, 2015

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GLCEDC and Heartland Community College Deliver Results for Local Manufacturers

glcedc_heartlandGLCEDC and Heartland Community College Deliver Results for Local Manufacturers.

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Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program boosts skills of manufacturing workforce

Pantagraph
Program boosts skills of manufacturing workforce
Sunday, April 20, 2014
by Lenore Sobota lsobota

PONTIAC – A cooperative effort between the Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council and Heartland Community College is providing a more well-rounded workforce for the area’s manufacturers, say those involved in the project.

The second group participating in the “Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing” training program graduated earlier this month, bringing to 26 the number who have completed the six-week, 100-hour program since it began last May.

Eleven of the 12 students in the first class were employed within one month of graduation and Adam Dontz, the EDC’s chief executive officer is expecting similar results from the second class.

Finding skilled, qualified employees is a key issue with economic development, Dontz said.

Manufacturing is the largest employment sector in Livingston County, with a dozen manufacturers providing about 2,500 jobs in the county, Dontz said.

“What we’ve done is married the business community with the academic community and, through that partnership, we’ve been successful,” he said.

A handful to students already had jobs when they started the program, but Dontz said the training makes them more valuable to the company and allows them to move up…

[READ ENTIRE PANTAGRAPH ARTICLE HERE]

Basic Arc Welding Class Registration

BASIC GAS METAL ARC WELDING CLASS
At
LIVINGSTON AREA CAREER CENTER
1100 E. Indiana Avenue, Pontiac, Illinois 61764

Thursday and Friday, June 12-13, 2014
Monday through Friday, June 16-20, 2014
Monday through Friday, June 23-27, 2014

8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Total Cost $300

For more information or to sign up, call 815-842-2557
Registration deadline Thursday, June 5, 2014

[DOWNLOAD INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION FORM]

Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program graduating class of 2014

By Cynthia Grau/Daily Leader
Staff Reporter
April 12, 2014

Fourteen students made it through their program and graduated Friday afternoon and are now looking forward to life in the working world.

Class

The second class of the Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, a workforce training program offered by the Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council, walked through commencement ceremonies Friday afternoon at the Livingston County Historic Courthouse.

The students completed 100 hours of instruction led by Heartland Community College faculty at the Pontiac Caterpillar facility with lab instruction at HCC, Normal. Graduates included Maria Blair, Christopher Close, Kurt Keefer, David Mabe, Cindy Pozdol, Sheri Thurston, Kasey Branscum, Joyce Colwell, Kay Grizzle, Danielle Lang, Mitchell Nelson, Kevin Raifsnider and Travis Williams.

After completing the course, graduates are guaranteed an interview at all of the participating businesses. Based on past results, placement rates are anticipated to exceed 90 percent. Participating businesses include Anthony Liftgates, Caterpillar, Exact Packaging, Hoffman Tool, Interlake Mecalux, Grundy-Kankakee-Livingston 1Workforce Investment Board, Quanex1, 1Kerry Group, Manpower1, RKO Saw and Tool1, Selig Sealants, Johnson Press of America, PTC Alliance, Slagel Manufacturing and Technical Metals.

Adam Dontz, CEO of the GLCEDC, greeted graduates and attendees.

“These 14 students are better equipped to either become employed or further their career in manufacturing,” Dontz said.

He added that the program currently has a 100 percent graduation rate and a 92 percent job placement rate, resulting from the first graduating class nine months ago.

“The intent of this program is three-fold. First, we sought to increase the skills and abilities of our local workforce,” Dontz explained. “By doing so, this program has already assisted those who are unemployed gain employment.”

Second, he said, they aim to add value to the single largest employment sector in Livingston County, which is manufacturing. Third of all, the successful completion of the program sends a message to businesses looking to make an investment into Livingston County.

“This is truly a public/private sector partnership,” Dontz said.

Dontz introduced Rob Widmer, president of Heartland Community College, who congratulated graduates on what he called “quite an achievement.”

“It’s a testament to your commitment to your perseverance and I’m sure quite a bit of sacrifice in the process,” Widmer said. “These are the hours you would have been with your family, hours you would have been driving to secure other employment, but this certainly is a testament to your efforts.”

Susan Toher, operations manager for Caterpillar, Inc., gave the day’s commencement address and spoke about the path she took to get to the job she serves currently.

“Sometimes you just have to try something that feels a little uncomfortable and assume that that step is going to lead to another and lead to another step,” Toher said.

She continued, saying her career wasn’t like a ladder, but more of a meandering path, which has worked out for her.

“I hope you take choices and risks and adventures, so you can find your own path,” Toher said.

Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program 2015 graduation ceremony announcement

The Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council (GLCEDC) is announcing the graduation ceremony for the second Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing Skills training program.

“The successful completion of this program marks the largest customized training program provided in Livingston County by Heartland Community College,” said Adam Dontz, CEO of the GLCEDC.

Fourteen students recently completed the 100-hour session developed by Heartland Community College (HCC) and the GLCEDC, with input from close to a dozen Livingston County companies. The public ceremony is scheduled for 2 p.m. Friday, April 11 in Pontiac’s Historic Livingston County Courthouse.

Susan Toher, Operations Manager at Caterpillar Pontiac and HCC Foundation Board member, is the commencement speaker.

The Fundaments of Modern Manufacturing Skills training program helps unemployed and under-employed residents of Livingston County upgrade their workforce readiness. After completing the course, graduates are guaranteed an interview at all of the participating businesses. Based on past results, placement rates are anticipated to exceed 90 percent.

Participating businesses include: Anthony LiftGates, Caterpillar, Exact Packaging, Hoffman Tool, Interlake Mecalus, Grundy, Kankakee, Livingston County Workforce Investment Board, Kerry Group, Manpower, Quanex, RKO Saw & Tool, Selig Sealants, Johnson Press of America, PTC Alliance, Slagel Manufacturing, and Technical Metals.

Classes begin approximately every six months, but could be more often depending on the amount of interested participants.

According to HCC Customized Training Coordinator, Austin Grammer, “This program provides adults with skills essential to Livingston County employers. The addition of these graduates to the workforce will be a definite boon to the local economy.”

Dontz first pitched the idea to the Livingston County Board a little more than a year ago and was given overwhelming support for the program and has since proven its success.

“The GLCEDC brought Livingston County’s manufacturing industry leaders together with Heartland Community College in an effort to enhance the skills of our local workforce. The program curriculum was created as Heartland’s deans sat alongside business leaders who expressed the skills that are needed in today’s sophisticated and computerized manufacturing environment,” Dontz said. “(The time frame) from discussing the needs of Livingston County business leaders to the first class graduating will be approximately six months. This quick and results-orientated action is what it takes to be competitive in today’s business climate and it’s exactly what Livingston County and the GLCEDC are capable of delivering.”

For questions about the program or graduation ceremony, contact Dontz adam@glcedc.org or visit www.glcedc.org.

For more information about Customized Training at Heartland Community College, visit www.heartland.edu/customizedTraining.

WJEZ podcast on 2014 Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program

WJEZ 98.9 FM Interview with Adam Dontz of the GLCEDC about job training, new members, and more.

Air Date: February 19, 2014

[audio:https://glcedc.org/audio/wjez02192014.mp3]

Welding Class to be Offered at LACC

The Livingston Area Career Center (LACC) is offering a BASIC GAS METAL ARC WELDING-MIG WELDING CLASS in February, 2014.

Monday through Thursday, February 3 — February 6, 2014
Monday through Thursday, February 10 — February 13, 2014
Monday through Thursday, February 17 — February 20, 2014

4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Total Cost $300

For more information or to sign up, call 815-842-2557
Registration deadline January 27, 2014

[DOWNLOAD INFORMATIONAL FLYER HERE]

WJEZ podcast on 2013 Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program

Adam Dontz, CEO of the Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council talks to WJEZ radio about the successful results of the Manufacturing Skills Training Program.

[audio:https://glcedc.org/audio/community_forum_07312013.mp3]

Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing 2013 Graduation

manufacturing_resized

Luke Smucker
Staff Reporter – Pontiac Daily Leader
Updated Jun. 28, 2013 @ 12:55 pm

Pontiac, Ill.  —

The county commissioners’ room of the Historic Livingston County Courthouse in Pontiac was filled Monday with friends and family, all in attendance to see the Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council’s graduation ceremony for the fundamentals of modern manufacturing skills training program.

The program celebrated the graduation of its first group of 12 students. Their successful completion of the program marked the proven success of the largest customized training program in Livingston County provided by Heartland Community College.

The goal of the program, when it was initially presented to the Livingston County Board by GLCEDC’s Chief Executive Officer Adam Dontz on April 11 is twofold: to attract new business to the area and at the same time help local businesses grow. During the board meeting, Dontz reported to board members that area businesses had expressed to him their need for a program which would focus on job training for the manufacturing trade. His proposal was a six-week program, in conjunction with Heartland Community College, which would involve a maximum of 20 students in an effort to enhance the skills of local workers.

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates would be invited to interview at all of the participating businesses. After 90 days of employment, a portion of the funds required to attend the program would be reimbursed from the company back to the education fund.

“Your successful completion of the program will send a message to investors considering Livingston County,” Dontz stated to the graduates. “This public-private partnership and the success of its graduates clearly demonstrates the quality of our labor force, the idea that government and business can work together quickly and swiftly, and most of all, the fact that we are one of the most progressive locations in the state because of how we retain and attract business.”

For Nick Runyon of Fairbury, success in the program translates to opportunity and future financial stability. Runyon was asked to attend the program by his employer, Technical Metals, Fairbury.

Going into the program, the graduate said he had no idea what to expect, but he hoped to come out of the program with an idea of whether or not this was the career path he wanted to pursue.

“I fully support it,” Runyon said of the program. “The things I learned here, when compared with what I learned at Technical Metals — I have a feeling guys are going to come to me now. I will have to train them, but I feel confident that I know what I am talking about. I see the difference this program can make.”

Runyon said he particularly the lessons on quality and safety measures. Runyon said the skills he learned weren’t tailored to his current employer and could be used in any manufacturing business.

“The safety parts are probably the most universal part of the class,” said Runyon. “That was the biggest learning experience for me because all of the companies involved in this don’t do the same thing, but everybody requires safety.”

Graduate Scott Brazzale, who interviewed within 24 hours of graduation, had a job the day after his interview.

“I was really interested in what they did over at Selig Sealing Products,” he said in regards to his new position. “I mentioned that they would be my first choice if I could interview anywhere and I interviewed well.”

Brazzale initially met Brad Gulliford, the plant manager at Selig, when Gulliford was serving as a guest speaker in the class. The employers in the county were able to meet the employees on a smaller scale, which helped make names of those who graduated stand out from the rest.

Brazzale said what he took away from the program was an awareness of the manufacturing process as a whole. It was something he wasn’t aware of prior to attending the class and he came away with an understanding of what it means to be a good employee.

“I am a lot more aware of product quality and how to use instruments to verify quality,” he said. “I also learned a lot about interviewing. Instructors in the class really helped us by going into depth about the interview process. Afterward, I felt much more comfortable and confident with the interviewing when I went to interview for my job.”

After opening comments from Dontz, Jerry Hoffman, the president of Hoffman Tool & Die and Technical Metals, spoke in regards to the next step for the graduates. In particular, he talked about the interview process. He started off by stating that while it takes about five years to become a machinist, that time span is significantly decreased for those who complete and learn from the GLCEDC’s program. He then focused on the importance of interviewing well and the importance of staying employed at the same place. He stated that 70 percent of people in today’s workforce dislike their job. In fact, he said the millennial generation, on average, will switch jobs once a year, a statistic that makes it hard for employers to consider a potential employee for hire.

To those taking part in the interview process upon graduation — some were presently employed — Hoffman suggested graduates should keep in mind the notion that the person who is interviewing them was hired because they are good at sifting the bad employees from those who would be an attribute to the company.

“Think about the impression you are making to the employer,” he implored. “Don’t expect a company to give you anything. Be willing to invest your own time learning and come in with a good track record. It’s difficult to award a revolving door. Remember, as an employee, your job is to give the company a chance.”

Those graduating included: William Aldridge, William Brennan, Kenneth Fullerton, Alan Lewis, Jr., Larry Payton, Jr., Trenton Steffen, Scott Brazzale, John Coleman, Jason Gorbet, Herby Matic, Nick Runyon and Timothy Young.

Pontiac Daily Leader Article Link: http://www.pontiacdailyleader.com/article/20130628/NEWS/130629314

GLCEDC Board approves funds for Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing program

PONTIAC DAILY LEADER
by Cynthia Grau
April 12. 2013 1:18PM

Board approves GLCEDC funds for skill training

Adam Dontz, chief executive officer of the Greater Livingston County Economic Development Council approached the Livingston County Board Thursday evening to request approval of granting funds for a program that will bring education to those interested in the manufacturing field.

The $42,900 requested had already been approved by the finance committee for the Manufacturing Skills Training Program, but had to be presented to the full board for a final vote. He said that the purpose of the GLCEDC is to attract new businesses to the area, but to also help businesses grow. He said in working with several local manufacturing businesses in Livingston County and the surrounding areas, he has learned of the importance of a job training program focused on manufacturing skills.

Dontz explained that has been working with Heartland Community College to create a 100-hour, six-week training program. Each class will have a maximum of 20 students, who not only have to meet specific requirements but also pass drug tests. After completing the course, the students are guaranteed an interview at all of the participating businesses. After being employed for 90 days, a portion of the tuition for the program will be reimbursed from the company back to the revolving education fund.

The Livingston County Board demonstrated its continued support of creating jobs and spurring local investment by supporting a manufacturing skills training program spearheaded by the GLCEDC and the local manufacturing industry. The GLCEDC brought Livingston County’s manufacturing industry leaders together with Heartland Community College in an effort to enhance the skills of our local workforce. The program curriculum was created as Heartland’s deans sat alongside business leaders who expressed the skills that are needed in today’s sophisticated and computerized manufacturing environment,” he said. “(The time frame) from discussing the needs of Livingston County business leaders to the first class graduating will be approximately six months. This quick and results orientated action is what it takes to be competitive in today’s business climate and it’s exactly what Livingston County and the GLCEDC are capable of delivering.”

After several comments from board members in support of the measure, as well as a few worried about funding another program, the board voted approve the request, with only Carolyn Gerwin and Mark Runyon voting against it. Dontz said he was happy with the outcome.

If folks are interested in enrollment information for the class they should contact Sandy Erschen at the Pontiac Manpower Office at 815-844-5091.”

Now Recruiting Manufacturing Training Students

Manpower Now Recruiting 20 Manufacturing Training Students

Apply today
815-844-5091

Tuition $2,235
If you qualify your cost is $90
Train for Your Future in Manufacturing. Partners are ready to invest in you and turn your abilities into employable skills.  Several Livingston County Manufacturing Employers Are Guaranteeing Interviews!  Heartland Community College has a comprehensive, customized training program providing you the skills local manufactures really want.

This six-week training program is geared toward adult learners

CLASS BEGINS MAY 13

ENROLL NOW!

Call Manpower to get your assessments started to see if you qualify

  • Ability Train to Gain Skill
  • Math Technical Math
  • Reading Reading for Information
  • Proper etiquette Work Ethics
  • Safety Manufacturing Safety
  • Attention to detail Quality Work
  • Mechanically inclined Principles of Manufacturing
  • Call Manpower at 815-844-5091
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